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Aliens Like You and Me

By Janet ManleySeptember 12, 2016
The best thing to come out of summer 2016, and this year's most promising Halloween theme is Stranger Things, Netflix's paranormal thriller about a middle-schooler, Will, who goes missing in his tiny American town in 1983. The show is a walking Pinterest board of glorious '80s film... More  →
Aliens Like You and Me

Blogging The Odyssey: Part 2 (The One Where We Find Out What the Hell Even Happened to Odysseus)

By ElodieSeptember 9, 2016
In case you missed it, I'm Elodie and I'm blogging The Odyssey, a book that is very heavy. Guys, it’s so heavy. I have dainty spaghetti arms and no upper arm strength. I am Suffering. Luckily for you, however, you don't have to lug this book around; you... More  →
Blogging <em>The Odyssey</em>: Part 2 (The One Where We Find Out What the Hell Even Happened to Odysseus)

Blogging Moby-Dick, Part Two: Everything You Never Wanted To Know About Whales

By Elaine AtwellSeptember 8, 2016
Read Part 1 of the series here! Ahoy and welcome back to Moby-Richard, our analysis of what is possibly one of the greatest (and certainly one of the longest) books in the English language. When last we left our hero(?) Ishmael(??), he had just boarded the Pequod... More  →
Blogging <i>Moby-Dick</i>, Part Two: Everything You Never Wanted To Know About Whales

If Shakespeare Characters Had Business Cards

By Steffi LynnSeptember 8, 2016
Remember when Steffi Lynn brought you Harry Potter business cards? SHE'S DONE IT AGAIN. Can't you picture Mercutio spotting you at a coffee shop, getting an espresso to go and on his way out slipping you his card... because we can. Onwards  More  →
If Shakespeare Characters Had Business Cards

All the Times Nick Describes Gatsby's Smile, Ranked in Order of How Platonic They Are

By ElodieSeptember 8, 2016
A common motif in The Great Gatsby is Gatsby smiling, which is immediately followed by Nick swooning so hard he just about dies. I learned this back when I was reading the book and blogging it chapter by chapter. I tried to take note whenever this happened,... More  →
All the Times Nick Describes Gatsby's Smile, Ranked in Order of How Platonic They Are

What to Expect From Your First Fiction Workshop

By Kurt HarrogateSeptember 7, 2016
When I showed up to my first fiction workshop as an English major, I had no idea what to expect; my high school hadn't had anything like it, and up to that point my creative writing experience had been limited to scribbling stories in my... More  →
What to Expect From Your First Fiction Workshop

How to Kiss, According to Shakespeare

By ElodieSeptember 7, 2016
Kissing is pretty neat. Let’s not dive too deeply into the haunted crypt that is my love life, but suffice it to say I have kissed a person or two in my time. No one's good at it right away; it takes practice. Learning to kiss... More  →
How to Kiss, According to Shakespeare

How Well Do You Know Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban?

By Chelsea DaggerSeptember 7, 2016
Stop us if this conversation looks familiar: Some moron: "What's the best part Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban?" You: *lengthy pause* The best part of Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, you say. Well let me think about that for a minute, cowboy. Let's just let it marinate,... More  →
How Well Do You Know <em>Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban</em>?

Blogging The Catcher in the Rye: Part 1 (In Which the Old Professor Picks His Nose)

By Emma W.September 6, 2016
If you're following along at home, this post covers chapters 1 and 2.  When my brother first read The Catcher in the Rye—he loved it—I asked my mom if I could read it, too (tho when did I start consulting with my mom on whether I could read... More  →
Blogging <i>The Catcher in the Rye</i>: Part 1 (In Which the Old Professor Picks His Nose)

How Much Kitty, Lydia, Lizzie, Jane, and Mary Is in You?

By Madeline GobboSeptember 6, 2016
When you're reading Pride and Prejudice for the ninth time, it's easy to identify with Elizabeth Bennet, sage, wit, and hero of the novel, and write off Kitty and Lydia as frivolous, Mary as socially maladapt, and Jane as TOO GOOD FOR THIS ROTTEN EARTH, but actually there's More  →
How Much Kitty, Lydia, Lizzie, Jane, and Mary Is in You?