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What It's Like To Go To A Frozen Sing-Along

What It's Like To Go To A Frozen Sing-Along

By Gabriel Laks

Disney

The MindHut

Everyone is talking. Wait, scratch that—almost everyone is talking and a select few are already singing. Eye popping film trailers are projected onto the screen in front of us but none merit much attention, save for The Lego Movie which has us all in stitches for two-and-a-half minutes before we start talking/singing again during an ad for Mr. Peabody & Sherman. Soon thereafter the Disney logo comes onscreen: there’s a momentary hush, the opening notes of “Frozen Heart” play, and we all cheer like it’s a Demi Lovato concert.

Welcome to the Frozen sing-along.

Disney released a sing-along version of Frozen in over 2000 theaters on Friday, helping your favorite movie/GIF factory gross nearly ten million dollars in its TENTH WEEKEND. That brings Frozen’s boxoffice total to over $850 million, though if Disney ever wins the right to charge you for singing its songs in the shower/on the bus/everywhere that total would easily go up to roughly 850 bazillionjilliontrillion dollars, causing all the nations of the world to bow down before the mighty Disney (so not much change, really).

The sing-along idea is fun and weird and delightfully geeky, a perfect fit for this wonderful movie that embodies all those adjectives and more. The screening had the feel of a younger Rocky Horror Picture Show, though one with decidedly more family friendly audience participation. The crowd, a mix of small children, parents, and young adults with tumblr accounts, may have been divided by age but could not have been more united in love for Anna, Elsa, Kristoph, and Olaf (but, SPOILERS, not Hans—whose villainous reveal was met with a chorus of boos). One girl near the theater’s front clutched a ukulele the whole showing, and though for some reason she never actually played it the instrument’s very presence added to the spirited hangout vibe in that room.

Word to the wise: it’s that very hangout vibe that makes the Frozen sing-along a pretty poor fit for those who are seeing the movie for the first time. People who plum hate it when others talk during a movie may want to steer clear too, for though the crowd was far too invested by the climax to make much non-singing-along-noise the early going was pretty chatty. Your mileage may vary.

If you’re a seasoned Frozen pro who doesn’t mind a little incidental noise at the movies though, it’s hard to imagine a more perfect event. The amount of audience participation varied a little bit from song to song (everyone was cheering when the movie started, but “Frozen Heart” didn’t inspire too many people to actually, you know, sing-along) but there was such a strong current of joy and excitement radiating from the crowd during “Let It Go” that it’s tough not use the old cliché that it was worth the price alone. Frozen’s a little top heavy in its song placement, which makes for a gradual tapering off of the whole singing thing, but really all that means is that for the last act of the film you’re just watching Classic Frozen with an amazing crowd.

Who knows if other musicals will repeat Disney’s mass sing-along formula (slightly related note: hey Hollywood, make more musicals!); it’d certainly be nice, though. It’s all too rare a night at the movies is as fun as this. The only thing that’s come close recently is, well, Classic Frozen. 

Do you want to see the Frozen sing-along.

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Topics: Life, Mindhut
Tags: movies, disney, musicals, animation, frozen, sing-a-long

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About the Author
Gabriel Laks

Gabriel Laks is a Seattle born and New York-based writer and director. His work has been featured in such places as College Humor and Channel 101, and his writing has been quoted in The New Yorker. Gabriel currently resides in Brooklyn, in an apartment filled to the brim with Adam West Batman memorabilia.

Wanna contact a writer or editor? Email contribute@sparknotes.com.