Skip over navigation

5 Self-Help Books You Shouldn't be Embarrassed to Read

5 Self-Help Books You Shouldn't be Embarrassed to Read

By Bo Larkin

You need help. We all need help. Though So You Fart Uncontrollably in Public, Now What? may not be a title to read at the coffee shop, not all self-help books are destined to be read locked in your bedroom, in the closet, under a blanket, in the dead of night. Here are five books we could all benefit from reading, which don't bear the stigma often attached to "self-help":

ADHD According to Zoe: The Real Deal on Relationships, Finding Your Focus, and Finding Your Keys, by Zoe Kessler

There's no shame in having ADHD, and reading a book to help cope with this common affliction shows that you're a mature human being looking to live a life more organized. That video of the sleepwalking dog is hilarious. I hope he's okay! The barista in this coffee shop is really pretty. I wonder if she’s single. Some split pea soup would really hit the spot right about now. What were we talking about?

The Teen's Guide to World Domination: Advice on Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Awesomeness, by Josh Shipp

You are officially making the world a better place by reading this book. Imagine a world where everyone was on a pursuit of awesomeness. Is there a chapter on erasing the existence of YOLO and twerking? That would definitely be a stop on the awesomeness express. Also, retail employees should be replaced by funny marionettes. That would make life pretty awesome as well. #puppetsrule Wait, hashtags probably don’t exist in the land of awesomeness.

I Will Teach You to be Rich, by Ramit Sethi

Did you just spend your entire savings on a vial of “authentic” Bruno Mars perspiration? If you were charged with gathering essentials for the inevitable zombie apocalypse, would a feather boa be on your list? If you answered yes and yes, please buy this book for the sake of humanity. While money isn’t everything, good luck trading your appreciation of beauty for a new car. From saving your babysitting cash to making smart purchase decisions, financial savvy is a must in our wheelin’ and dealin’ society.

Do Hard Things: A Teenage Rebellion Against Low Expectations, by Alex Harris, Brett Harris

Has anyone ever squashed your dreams by telling you to play it safe? Forget the haters, you intelligent, beautiful, creative Sparklers! You want to manufacture rainbows in an office located on top of a cloud, so make it happen! Adults don’t always understand that our world offers endless possibilities for employment, romance, and happiness in general. It’s hard for your grandpa to get over his ninth birthday, when his father made him choose between working in the cornfields or the mineshaft.

Tuesdays With Morrie: An Old Man, a Young Man, and Life’s Greatest Lesson, by Mitch Albom

Without adults in our lives, how would society function? Would we be reduced to blowing on conch shells in order to assemble our friends? How would the New York Stock Exchange, run by six-year-olds, affect the global economy? Although we think we know everything there is to know, maybe it’s a good idea to heed the advice of our elders, in case we missed a couple things on our life’s journey thus far.

 Have you ever read a self-help book? Which one?

Topics: Books, Life, Advice, The SparkNote to You
Tags: life lessons, books, self-improvement, reading, self-help

Write your own comment!

OR

About the Author
Bo Larkin

Based out of Chicago, Bo Larkin, aka Bryan Albert, makes a living as a writer and musician. Bryan comprises half of the cabaret/art song duo "Lovers' Quarrel" and is a guitar teacher and ensemble coach at Sherwood at Columbia College and Southport Performing Arts Conservatory. Check him out at Chicagoguitarist.com and @bogitano

Wanna contact a writer or editor? Email contribute@sparknotes.com.