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These Supporting Characters Are So Awesome That They Deserve Their Own Book

These Supporting Characters Are So Awesome That They Deserve Their Own Book

By Melissa Albert

Just because J.K. Rowling's done (OR IS SHE?) writing about Harry Potter, boy wizard, doesn't mean the world's done hearing about him. And just because Tolkien's Arwen is a relatively slight character, it doesn't mean she hasn't inspired enough fanfics to fill Hermione's magical handbag. Sometimes writers create characters so fascinating, the world refuses to let them go. And sometimes the characters are SO good that other authors take them as their own—as in Jodi Lynn Anderson's new book Tiger Lily, which gives a peripheral character from J.M. Barrie's Peter Pan her own story. After reading/crying over Tiger Lily, we've got suggestions for the next supporting characters to get their own book. Let's help each other out, all you blocked writers out there! (We take no responsibility for copyright infringement.)

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory's Willy Wonka. Who are you, Willy Wonka? Why are you so weird? Are all your teeth actually dentures by now? We know Tim Burton tried explaining Wonka's eccentricities away with a mean dentist dad, but we don't buy it. We think his backstory is way more complex and wonderful than that, and we want somebody to tell us exactly how crazy Uncle Wonka became the eccentric king of a magical candy empire.

The Chronicles of Narnia's Jadis, the White Witch. Though the White Witch's past is briefly covered in The Magician's Nephew, we want the full scoop. We like to see her as the Darth Vader to Daenerys Targaryen's Luke Skywalker: both women are the youngest survivor of a line of powerful kings and queens who went bad. So what's your motivation, Jadis, for wanting to stop summer from ever coming? What was your childhood like in Charn? Is the scary witch from The Silver Chair a relative, and if so, are your family reunions as terri-mazing as we imagine them to be? Sorry, C.S. Lewis. Your cruelest character may also be your most interesting.

The Great Gatsby's Jordan. Cool, self-serving, and incapable of apology, this hard-nosed flapper/athlete would be perfect as the hero of her own Hamptons noir. Think Revenge meets The Big Sleep. And THEN think about who will play the 1920s Nolan Ross-type character in the film adaptation!!

Harry Potter's invisibility cloak. Before it fell into Harry's hands, the cloak was the property of James Potter. And waaaaay before that, it was given by Death (so goes the story) to three brothers. But what happened in between, as it passed through the possession of all those Peverells? And what adventures will Albus Severus Potter have with it after he nicks it from his old dad's closet? (Wizard dads keep better things than birthday presents and questionable reading material on the top shelves of their closets.) This book could be like The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants, but with more death and magic.

An Abundance of Katherines' Hassan Harbish. I don't care how lazy he is, Hassan Harbish is going places. We want a book (by John Green, to be specific) that details his adventures in college, and how he uses the wit and take-no-prisoners attitude of his beloved Judge Judy to save his college from frat invasion and find true love.

Which supporting character do you think deserves their own book? We're thinking Chip "The Colonel" Martin from Looking for Alaska and Finnick Odair from The Hunger Games!

Topics: Books, Life
Tags: harry potter, books we love, willy wonka, funny things, john green, classics, fictional characters, characters we love, the chronicles of narnia, the great gastby

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About the Author
Melissa Albert

Melissa Albert reads books, worries about other people’s dogs (they look thirsty), and eats horrible candy for fun and profit. When not wearing her extremely tasteful Sparkitor hat, she’s an editor for the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. You can find her on Twitter @mimi_albert, or in the hot pretzel section of your local cafeteria.

Wanna contact a writer or editor? Email contribute@sparknotes.com.