Skip over navigation

How to Convince Your Parents to Change Your Curfew

How to Convince Your Parents to Change Your Curfew

By Sissy

Ever feel like your parents keep such a tight leash on you, it’s like you’re still attached to your mom by the umbilical cord? Ever feel like they wish they could carry you around in their pockets, where no one could hurt or find you? Parents sometimes love too hard. This love, and the worry that comes with it, can dampen your day-to-day life. As your parents make more rules and regulations, including a strict policy on curfew, your spirit suffers and you become a surly teen. How do you get your folks to be rational human beings and realize that you’re old enough to come home around the time SNL is over (or at least not just starting…)?

You need to make a sound argument based on solid logic. Use this framework to convince your parents that you can be trusted to stay out later. Sit them down and….

1. Start by telling them “I am a responsible young adult.” Of course, your parents know that you're a good kid—they’ve seen your report cards, and they regularly go through your drawers while you're at school. Since they haven’t found anything yet, they know you’re trustworthy. Still, it never hurts to remind them. Talk about your high GPA, the fact that you’ve never been in a car accident, and  your incredible sense of direction, which rivals that of a compass. At this point, they will start to realize that it’s true: you are smart kid who hasn’t put herself in any bad situations (yet). Now, it’s time for you to…

2. Remind your parents of times where you have acted boldly and bravely. How you act in a crisis really shows your true colors. If you have been a hero in a specific instance, or even just acted wise beyond your years, don’t let your parents forget your act of valor. Remind them of that time you called 911 at the tender age of six after your little brother swallowed the change in your mom’s purse. Don’t let them forget that time you helped the old lady cross the street after a car almost hit her. And let’s all remember that you’re the one who screamed to your mom to “stop, drop and roll” when she accidentally caught on fire after leaning over a lit candle to light another candle. You saved her life and she owes you. The least she can do before dismissing your curfew request is listen to your last argument, in which you….

3. Compare and contrast how much smarter you are than everyone else. Start with your inner circle of friends and acquaintances. Does your mom remember the girl who used to live next door, the one who accidentally crashed into the McDonald’s drive thru after school while getting her milkshake? Yeah, well make sure your mom knows that even THAT girl has a later curfew than you. Did your mom hear that the extremely tan chick from “Jersey Shore” now isn’t just a party girl, but the mother to a little nugget child? Yeah, well, if Snooki can be a parent, you can handle a little extra night in your life, right? Keep rattling off names, and remember...

4. Don’t give up. Your parents aren’t going to cave on this one right away. So be relentless. You may have to have this same conversation with them several times before they even start thinking about giving in. But be persistent. After all, there is only so much logic they can take. After a while, they may give you a curfew extension to shut you up. In which case, you’ve won!

Do you have a super early curfew because your parents are totally lame and love you so much? What other rules and restrictions do they put on you that seem sooooooo unnecessary? We want to hear!

Topics: Life
Tags: parents, rules, how to, debates, conversations, curfews

Write your own comment!


Write your own comment!


About the Author
Sissy

Sissy is a woman/girl who lives, works and eats too much popcorn on the north side of Chicago. Bet you couldn't guess that her real name is actually not Sissy, but it's what her family likes to call her by. Also, She's loud and is very glad you can't hear her.

Wanna contact a writer or editor? Email contribute@sparknotes.com.