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Blogging B&N.com's Teen Must Reads: The Unbecoming of Mara Dyer

Blogging B&N.com's Teen Must Reads: The Unbecoming of Mara Dyer

By Contributor

Catch up on the rest of the series here!

Book: The Unbecoming of Mara Dyer by Michelle Hodkin

Synopsis: After her friends are killed in a horrendous accident of which she was the only survivor, Mara’s life begins to unravel. She’s convinced that there’s more to the accident than she remembers, but when the truth finally comes to light, it’s far worse than she could have imagined. Luckily, her hot British boyfriend is there to help.

Is this a “must-read”?: Not quite, but it's getting there.

Why?: The premise of Mara Dyer is really unique, and it has a ton of cool thematic potential. All of the characters have different motivations and personalities, and Mara even has a sense of humor. Hodkin makes it difficult to tell what’s actually happening and what’s just a dream or hallucination, which works, though it can be confusing at times. Mara Dyer does fall prey to several YA stereotypes, however. Mara is a pale, supposedly plain-looking brunette; her best friend is a quirky outcast; her boyfriend is an impossibly gorgeous, Disney movie-devoted tortured-bad-boy-with-a-heart-of-gold; and the school queen bee makes Regina George look like Molly from Sherlock. Then there’s the angst and the fact that the entire thing has a kind of B-grade teen movie feel that bugged me.

Overall, though, it's not a terrible read, but it didn’t blow me away, either. The clichés frustrated me. I felt like it could’ve been so much better if only it wasn’t so…formulaic. I may be biased, though, because having read 16 other YA novels immediately before this one, I’m more than a little sick of miserable brunettes, girls who get the perfect guy without so much as a seductive glance, and schools populated solely by Abercrombie models. (Come on writers! Give these characters some acne and love handles!) The ending isn’t really satisfying because Mara Dyer is an intro book. It answers enough of the questions to keep you interested, but there are still a trillion more loose ends after the last page. If you like novels that make it impossible to tell whether what’s happening is actually happening and you don’t mind YA clichés, go ahead and check it out. If you’re one of those people who just want the writer to tell us what’s going on already, then the added nuisance of YA clichés will likely make Mara Dyer impossible for you.

Next time: Every Other Day by Jennifer Lynn Barnes

Will you be reading The Unbecoming of Mara Dyer?

Post by dac213!

Topics: Books, Life
Tags: sparkler posts, books, ya novels, book reviews, teen novels, blogging books, blogging b&n.com's must-reads, the unbecoming of mara dyer, paranormal fiction

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